Photos

 

Join author Jean Auel on this virtual tour—including photos of the important sites she’s visited, artifacts that have inspired her, and behind-the-scenes moments in the publishing of the Earth’s Children® Series.

 
    
 

SIGN UP AND RECEIVE NEWS AND UPDATES!


®Earth's Children is a registered trademark of Jean M. Auel.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Use

4
5
6
7
8
10
11
12
13
14
15
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
27

Spear

Thrower and spear. These hunting weapons were made by Jim Riggs, the man who conducted the class. This was meant as a practice weapon, there is to point on it. A flint point could be attached to a small piece of shaft and fitted into the end of a spear.

28

Spear

Thrower and spear. These hunting weapons were made by Jim Riggs, the man who conducted the class. This was meant as a practice weapon, there is to point on it. A flint point could be attached to a small piece of shaft and fitted into the end of a spear.

29

Cordage

Made from plant-stalk fibers and sinew. The plant, such as dogbane, is left to dry, then the fibers are peeled off the stalk, and rubbed between palms until they are free of any other material. The process of making cord, usually two-ply, involves twisting the fibers in two different directions at the same time. It is very hard to explain, but quite easy to do after someone shows you. For sinew cordage, the tendon from the back of the legs or along the backbone is stripped and left to dry. Then it is separated by peeling fibers of various sizes apart, depending upon how big you want your cordage. The cordage is made the same way and when made from sinew, is extremely strong.

30

Buckskin Bag

Made from the hide of a deer. The hair was scraped off the outer skin, and membranes scraped off the inner skin with and obsidian scaper. Then the hide was put to soak in a container, like a bucket, of squashed deer brains and water. It is easy to determine the amount of brains to use. Each animal has just enough brains to preserve its hide. The water and brain solution was then squeezed out and the hide tied to a frame with cordage pulled through small holes pierced all around the edge of the deerskin. The hide was constantly worked as it was drying to keep it flexible. Several hours later the hide was nearly white and though sturdy, it was very soft, almost like velvet. But in order to maintain that texture, it had to be smoked. As the elements in the smoke coated each collagen fiber, it changed color to a yellowish tan, the exact shade depending on the type of wood that was burned to make the smoke. After it is smoked, the hide can get wet or be washed without getting stiff and hard. Buckskin can be used to make warm and comfortable clothing.